West African countries are gathering a “standby force” in case of another coup in Niger.

Following a conference to discuss the coup, the president of the Ivory Coast said that the West African states have given their approval for army intervention in Niger “as soon as feasible.”

The leaders of the Ecowas regional grouping announced at the conference that they had reached an agreement to establish a “standby” armed force.

The use of force would be a “last choice,” according to Nigeria’s President Bola Tinubu, who made that statement.

On July 26, a military junta took control of Niger and proclaimed themselves dictators.

The United States and the United Nations have both expressed their worry for the health and safety of Mohamed Bazoum, who has been under house arrest for more than two weeks at this point.

The Secretary General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, expressed his worry over the “deplorable living circumstances” that Mr. Bazoum and his family were apparently enduring.

Following the conclusion of the Ecowas summit, Alassane Ouattara of Ivory Coast said that Ecowas has previously interfered in African nations in order to restore constitutional order.

He said, “Today, we have a similar scenario in Niger, and I would want to stress that Ecowas cannot allow this.” “Today, we have a similar situation in Niger.”

Mr. Ouattara said that the Ivory Coast would supply a battalion consisting of 850 to 1,100 troops, and he further stated that soldiers from Nigeria and Benin would also be sent.

Omar Touray, the current president of the Ecowas organization, said that members had reached a consensus “to authorize the deployment of the Ecowas standby force to restore constitutional order in Niger.”

He did not provide any additional specifics about the possible appearance of the force that it wants to build or the potential actions that it may take.

Prior to the conference, Muslim clerics from northern Nigeria, which has a long border with Niger, had asked Nigerian President Tinubu not to use force to dislodge the coup leaders. Niger and Nigeria have a long border.

After the meeting, however, he made the following statement: “No option is taken off the table, including the use of force as a last resort.”

“No one else is going to do it for us if we don’t do it ourselves.”

An easy-to-understand rundown of recent events in Niger

Retaliation from Tinubu for the deployment of force in coup-stricken Niger

The former United Nations peacekeeper in Niger was responsible for staging the coup.

The leaders of the coup have issued a warning that they are prepared to defend themselves against any interference.

The Niger junta had been given until the previous Sunday to reinstate the administration that had been lawfully elected, but they disregarded the ultimatum provided by Ecowas.

Instead, the military chiefs chose the members of the new government.

The United States and France both have military sites in Niger, and these outposts have been used as a part of ongoing operations to combat terrorist organizations throughout the broader Sahel area.

Earlier this week, United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken expressed his belief to the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) that the Russian mercenary company Wagner is “taking advantage” of the turmoil in Niger. Following a conference to discuss the coup, the president of the Ivory Coast said that the West African states have given their approval for army intervention in Niger “as soon as feasible.”

The leaders of the Ecowas regional grouping announced at the conference that they had reached an agreement to establish a “standby” armed force.

The use of force would be a “last choice,” according to Nigeria’s President Bola Tinubu, who made that statement.

On July 26, a military junta took control of Niger and proclaimed themselves dictators.

The United States and the United Nations have both expressed their worry for the health and safety of Mohamed Bazoum, who has been under house arrest for more than two weeks at this point.

The Secretary General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, expressed his worry over the “deplorable living circumstances” that Mr. Bazoum and his family were apparently enduring.

Following the conclusion of the Ecowas summit, Alassane Ouattara of Ivory Coast said that Ecowas has previously interfered in African nations in order to restore constitutional order.

He said, “Today, we have a similar scenario in Niger, and I would want to stress that Ecowas cannot allow this.” “Today, we have a similar situation in Niger.”

Mr. Ouattara said that the Ivory Coast would supply a battalion consisting of 850 to 1,100 troops, and he further stated that soldiers from Nigeria and Benin would also be sent.

Omar Touray, the current president of the Ecowas organization, said that members had reached a consensus “to authorize the deployment of the Ecowas standby force to restore constitutional order in Niger.”

He did not provide any additional specifics about the possible appearance of the force that it wants to build or the potential actions that it may take.

Prior to the conference, Muslim clerics from northern Nigeria, which has a long border with Niger, had asked Nigerian President Tinubu not to use force to dislodge the coup leaders. Niger and Nigeria have a long border.

After the meeting, however, he made the following statement: “No option is taken off the table, including the use of force as a last resort.”

“No one else is going to do it for us if we don’t do it ourselves.”

An easy-to-understand rundown of recent events in Niger

Retaliation from Tinubu for the deployment of force in coup-stricken Niger

The former United Nations peacekeeper in Niger was responsible for staging the coup.

The leaders of the coup have issued a warning that they are prepared to defend themselves against any interference.

The Niger junta had been given until the previous Sunday to reinstate the administration that had been lawfully elected, but they disregarded the ultimatum provided by Ecowas.

Instead, the military chiefs chose the members of the new government.

The United States and France both have military sites in Niger, and these outposts have been used as a part of ongoing operations to combat terrorist organizations throughout the broader Sahel area.

Earlier this week, United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken expressed his belief to the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) that the Russian mercenary company Wagner is “taking advantage” of the turmoil in Niger.

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